Membrillo (Quince Paste)

Fall is my favorite season for many reasons; cooler weather, leaves changing colors, decorating for Halloween, pumpkin spice lattes, and baking lots of yummy food! Fall is also the time of year I scour the grocery stores for quince, the main ingredient in membrillo.

I have spent the last three weeks searching for this unique fruit. When people ask me what a quince is, I tell them it’s what you would get if a pear and an apple had a baby. Some believe the serpent tempted Eve with a quince, not an apple. Quince do grow in the Middle East after all…

When I finally found quince last week, I bought four at $2.29 each (worth it)! My plan was to make quince jam, once I enjoyed their heavenly aroma for a few days. Then my daughter suggested I make membrillo, and just like that, my plans changed! I did some quick research on the fine art of making membrillo and decided I was ready to take on the challenge.

One thing I will change in the future is using four quince, instead of two. I wasn’t sure if I’d come across any more quince this season, so I played it safe and saved two to make a couple jars of jam. Don’t worry, this recipe has already been adjusted so that your membrillo will be thicker than mine.

 

 



Print Recipe
Membrillo (Quince Paste)
membrillo
Course Dessert, Snacks
Cuisine Spanish
Servings
1" pieces
Ingredients
Course Dessert, Snacks
Cuisine Spanish
Servings
1" pieces
Ingredients
membrillo
Instructions
  1. Butter one side of parchment paper and place (buttered side up) into an 8 x 8 ceramic dish. Set aside for later.
  2. Wash and remove the fuzz off the quince, especially if freshly picked. The fuzz will most likely already be cleaned off from store-bought quince.
    membrillo
  3. Chop the quince into chunks. You can either peel them, or leave them as is. You will have a smoother texture in the end if you peel them. I didn't peel mine, but I will the next time!
    membrillo
  4. Place chopped quince in a 6 quart saucepan and cover with plenty of water.
    membrillo
  5. Bring to a boil and cook, covered, for 40 minutes, or until the fruit is fork-tender.
    membrillo
  6. Once done, drain into a strainer.
    membrillo
  7. Puree the quince in a food processor until you achieve an apple sauce consistency. Using a kitchen scale, weigh the quince puree, then add back into the empty saucepan.
    membrillo
  8. Weigh out an equal amount of sugar and add to the quince. In my case it was a pound of each. Stir over low-medium heat until the sugar liquifies. Slit the vanilla bean down the center and add to the same pot.
    membrillo
  9. Stir frequently while cooking. You will notice that the color of the quince will begin to deepen the longer it cooks.
    membrillo
  10. After about an hour of cooking, remove the vanilla bean and stir in the lemon juice. Continue to cook, stirring frequently.
    membrillo
  11. This is what the quince looked like after 1 1/2 hours of cooking time.
    membrillo
  12. Using a spatula, transfer the mixture into the prepared dish.
    membrillo
  13. To achieve a smoother surface, I used a buttered sheet of parchment paper to cover the membrillo. I then ran my hands over the parchment paper to smooth out the surface.
    membrillo
  14. Refrigerate the membrillo for a couple of hours until it sets. To serve, cut into squares and serve with Manchego cheese and a nice glass of wine.
Share this Recipe


2 thoughts on “Membrillo (Quince Paste)”

    • Thank you for your comment, Salvador. I’m just learning about this delicious treat, but I’m already addicted. I found more quince at my local grocery store last night and bought 8 more. I’m ready for round two, and of course, some quince jam!

Leave a Reply


Join Mailing List
Get notified when a new recipe is posted!
We respect your privacy.