Quince Jam (Muraba’t Sparijleh)

Have you ever wondered what the difference is between jam, jelly, and preserves? I know I have! For that reason, I sit here considering what to name this recipe; quince jam, or quince preserves? One thing I am certain of, it’s not jelly. Let’s take a look at some of the differences.

Jam, Jelly, or Preserves?

Jelly is made with fruit juice and has a firm and smooth jello-like consistency. As a result, I have never been a big fan of jelly. Jam is made with crushed fruit, and has an even consistency. Preserves on the other hand,  is chunkier than jam, and has larger pieces of fruit in it. Personally, I prefer preserves. What’s your preference?

Keeping those facts in mind, I suppose this recipe can be called quince jam, or quince preserves. It all depends on whether you emulsify the quince at the end of the recipe, or leave them chunky. The ingredients are the same, the only difference is the texture.

Be warned that quince are pretty hard to come by. They are only available this time of year (Fall). If you think that you might be interested in trying this recipe, please don’t wait too long. Before you know it, your window of opportunity will have slipped by. If you are seriously considering making this recipe, put down your laptop or phone, and get to the nearest grocery store to purchase some quince before they’re gone!


Print Recipe
Quince Jam (Muraba't Sparijleh)
quince jam
Course Snacks
Servings
8 oz jars
Ingredients
Course Snacks
Servings
8 oz jars
Ingredients
quince jam
Instructions
  1. Wash the jars and lids in hot, soapy water and rinse. Sterilize the jars by boiling them for 10 minutes. Keep them in the hot water until needed.
    boiled jars
  2. Wash and chop the quince into 1" pieces. If you prefer, you can dice the quince into smaller pieces. Later in the process, I use a handheld immersion blender to break the quince down to the consistency that I like. If you don't want to do this, you can just dice them into smaller pieces now.
  3. Place quince in a five qt. Dutch oven. Add enough water to completely cover the quince. Bring to a boil, then simmer for 15 minutes.
    quince jam
  4. Place a strainer over a bowl and drain the quince, capturing the liquid. Reserve two cups of the liquid. This liquid will be used in the recipe instead of plain water because quince have a high pectin content. This will aid in the jelling of the jam.
    quince jam
  5. Place the quince back into the empty Dutch oven and add the remaining ingredients, including the reserved liquid. Bring to a boil, while stirring over medium heat.
    quince jam
  6. Simmer for approximately 30 minutes, stirring occasionally, until the syrup thickens. At this point, you can use the immersion blender to break up the jam so it's less chunky, or leave as is.
    quince jam
  7. Ladle the hot jam into hot jars, leaving 1/4” headspace.
    quince jam
  8. Tighten the caps on the jars and place back into the boiling water, process for 10 minutes.
    quince jam
  9. Use jar lifting tongs to remove the jars from the boiling water. Cool, then store up to a year.
    quince jam
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